Who We Are:

What if all students graduated high school with the knowledge, skills and habits they need to lead a fulfilled life?  This is the question that guides our mission at Summit Public Schools

Summit is a leading network of public schools that prepare a diverse student population for success in a four-year college and to be thoughtful, contributing members of society. We operate 14 schools serving over 4,500 students in the Bay Area and Washington state. 100% of Summit graduates are college-ready and Summit graduates complete college at double the national average.

We need exceptional, diverse, and mission-aligned teachers to join our team to help prepare our students for a fulfilled life. Join us!

The Summit Model

Summit’s research-backed model makes teaching and learning at a Summit school unlike any other. 

At Summit, our teachers mentor the same group of students each year in advisory groups, which allows them to build strong relationships based on deep trust over multiple years. Mentors meet 1:1 with each student regularly to coach students toward their personal goals and meet daily as a mentor group.

During Project Time,  teachers teach universal skills through real-world projects - using their subject-area expertise to help students apply their knowledge to the world around them. Through our research-backed curriculum, Summit gives teachers the tools they need so that they can focus on teaching and becoming the best project-based teachers in the world. 

We are deeply committed to continuous improvement at Summit, both as an organization and for our individual faculty. With dedicated days of professional development built into the academic year, regular coaching sessions with a school leader, and a culture of honest, actionable, and timely feedback, we equip our teachers with the tools necessary to improve their practice and tackle challenging issues. We also prioritize developing leaders from within and have invested in multiple career pathway programs for our teachers and school leaders. 

Summit has intensive collaboration structures built into our weekly schedules. Teachers collaborate at the grade and subject levels, forming regular communities of practice to support each other in continuously improving as project-based teachers and mentors.

By design, our schools are small communities where every student is known. They are intentionally heterogeneous and reflect the diversity of the communities in which we operate. As a teacher, this will require being culturally responsive and creating equitable learning pathways for all students.

What you’ll do:

The Special Education Teacher is responsible for acting as a full faculty member, across all school systems (such as grade-level teams and weekly faculty meetings) by inputting advice, student status updates and personal opinions and ideas. In addition, the Special Education Teacher will have sole responsibility for, and be expected to:

  • Support design and implementation of accommodated instruction, classroom accommodations, and assessment of Individualized Education Plan (IEP) Goals for students receiving Special Education services
  • Facilitate IEP-based instruction in a resource room setting. 
  • Provide case management for a caseload of students:
    • Ensure students are consistently receiving supports, accommodations, and/or modifications as delineated in each student’s Individualized Education Plans (IEP)
    • Consult with general education teachers to adjust core curriculum, instruction and assessment to meet the unique learning needs and styles of a caseload of students
    • Collaborate with school staff, related service providers and parents to collect information and monitor the progress of a caseload of students in order to review and adjust educational plans at least annually
  • Lead the development and design of IEPs for a caseload of students receiving special education, including facilitating IEP meetings
  • Administer and interpret academic diagnostic assessments to determine learners’ strengths and areas of need for initial, and triennial assessments
  • Create and maintain notifications, records, files, and reports as required by federal, state and local regulations
  • Maintain knowledge of current regulations pertaining to special education
  • Serve on a professional development team with other Special Education Teachers across the Summit network to collaborate
  • Provide support to students in office hours before and/or after school one day each week
  • Utilize an instructional coach to develop educator skills and apply new practices to support students with exceptional needs and mentees.
  • See sample teacher schedules here. A student school day is around 8-8:30am to 3-3:30pm, depending on the specific school. Teachers stay until 5pm three days per week.

What you need:

  • Commitment to uphold Summit’s values, and the belief that all children deserve a rigorous and equitable education that prepares them for college and for life
  • Teaching Credential in California, Washington, or another US state
  • Bachelor’s Degree (a Master’s Degree in Education is preferred, but not required)
  • Clear health and background check
  • Teaching experience in your subject preferred, but not required
  • Experience with California’s electronic IEP system, SEIS, preferred
  • Experience writing state compliant IEPs, preferred

Who you are:

  • You want to be a world-class project-based learning teacher 
  • You thrive while collaborating and are excited to work with mission-aligned, high-performing colleagues. You find positivity in shared successes.
  • You’re excited to teach Summit’s common curriculum and assessment system, which was designed for teachers and by teachers in partnership with learning scientists. 
  • You care deeply about working in intentionally heterogeneous schools and are ready to support all diverse students to reach a fulfilled life
  • You’re eager to engage in professional development and be developed as a practitioner in a network that is committed to continuous improvement.
  • You have a growth mindset and see feedback as a positive
  • You are passionate about serving as a mentor and advocate for a group of students that you’ll follow year to year. You’re open to having hard conversations to support students. 

What you get:

Summit offers competitive salaries and benefit options for full-time employees, including covering 75% of the health, dental and vision plan costs. We fully cover life and disability insurance. We have a “take what you need” PTO policy, 11 paid holidays and 3 weeks of organizational-wide closure during the year.

Summit is an equal opportunity employer. We believe that diversity, equity, and inclusion are directly intertwined with education. We are ALL better when we are able to bring our whole selves to work and honor each other’s voices across identities, cultural backgrounds, and life experiences. We welcome and encourage applications from individuals who are members of historically marginalized communities. Spanish language proficiency is a plus. 

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